Conclusion
After the Morant Bay rebellion of 1865, the Jamaican state was refor
lated fora second time in thirty years.With direct elections abolished
new centrally appointed government embarked on a program of ‘‘m
ernization’’thatincludedchangesinthesystemofcourtsalongwiths
in the structure of land tenure, family law, and taxation.1 The penal
tem, however, remained much as it had been since the 1850s, combi
the use of thewhip to punish men with extensive use of the prisons. M
of Jamaica’s most significant political and religious leaders of the next
cades, including Leonard Howell and Marcus Garvey, would spend t
in the island’s major prisons.2
Jamaica had by then witnessed several successive penal complexe
the period of the expansion of slavery, planters had been largely resp
sibleformaintainingthesubordinationoftheirslaves.Theyusedthes
to sanction theviolence required to maintain the system of slavery, in
process legitimating an extreme use of violence in hierarchical relat
ships that drew on but exceeded what had previously been acceptab
Britain. When state forces officially intervened, they did so primaril
put down rebellions that the repressive forces of individual plantat
were unable to suppress. In addition, planters’ use of the slave co
to rid themselves of especially resistant or disruptive slaves dramatic
represented the conjoined power of slaveowner and state. Over tim
Jamaican-based planter elite consolidated itself, forming a network
collectively filled most of the positions in the islandwide and parish-l
state institutions. This elite organized, through the increasingly com
g
2004.8.31
07:45
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Paton
/
NO
BOND
BUT
THE
LAW
/
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