CONTRIBUTORS
Stephen Barber is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Rhode Island. His
essay in this collection derives from his dissertation on the parrhesiastic ethics and aesthet-
ics of Michel Foucault and Virginia Woolf. He is completing a book, provisionally entitled
On Being III with Proust and Woolf, on counterdiscursive inscriptions of illness in Proust,
Woolf, and Jarman.
Renu Bora is a graduate student in the Department of English at Duke University. He is
currently writing his dissertation on texture.
Anne Chandler teaches English literature at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale.
Her research on Thomas Day and the Edgeworths continues, alongside current work with
Mary Wollstonecraft's educationism and fiction.
James Creech is Professor of French at Miami University. His latest book is Closet Writ-
ing/Gay Reading. The present article is excerpted from his current project entitled "The
French Closet."
Tyler Curtain is a graduate of the Department of Computer Science, School of Engineer-
ing, University of Colorado at Boulder. He has worked with the Nation Center for Atmo-
spheric Research's Scientific Computing Division and AT&T's Advanced Technology Group
in Denver, Colorado. He is currently a graduate student in English at the Johns Hopkins
University, writing about problems of moral philosophy and sexuality in eighteenth- and
nineteenth-century literature.
Jonathan Goldberg is Professor of English at Duke University. He is the author of Sodome-
tries: Renaissance Texts, Modern Sexualities and has edited both Queering the Renaissance and
Reclaiming Sodom.
Joseph Litvak is Associate Professor of English at Bowdoin College. He is the author of
Caught in the Act: Theatricality in the Nineteenth-Century English Novel and, most recently,
"Pedagogy and Sexuality" and "Discipline, Spectacle, and Melancholia in and around the
Gay Studies Classroom." His essay in this issue is a part of a book he is currently complet-
ing on the politics of sophistication from Jane Austen to cultural studies.
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