C O N C L U S I O N
L I M I T S T H AT D O N O T F O R E C L O S E
Bodies in Analogic Traffic
This book has sought to trace the mutually constitutive coming- into- beings
of bodies and hormones in Bahia. It has done so through a focus on the
embodied experience of menstruation and its hormonal suppression and
an analysis of how blood emerges as a locus upon and through which vary-
ing types of effects (chemical, affective, relational, infectious, metaphysi-
cal) infold themselves into bodies. My analysis of menstruation in Bahia
introduces a central theme that runs through the book, namely the question
of how boundaries—and bodily boundaries, in particular—are sustained,
negotiated, or made porous. Drawing on interview data on menstruation
and hormone use, I examined the different ways Bahian women experience
and deal with menstrual cycle changes. Rather than presenting hormonal
menstrual suppression as an entirely novel phenomenon, I set this practice
alongside strategies of menstrual management that have long been available
to women. In Bahia, menstruation is widely discussed in terms of its natu-
ralness or artificiality. I therefore set out to examine the idea that women
should be able to choose if and when to menstruate in light of the reasons
they give for their choice. The practice appeals to an ideal of modernity, em-
blematized by a move out of nature made possible through technological
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