Acknowledgments
This project had its genesis at the University of California, Riverside,
where frequently I shared lunch with my friend and colleague Carole-
Anne Tyler. During lunch one day, she suggested that I write a book
about punctuation since I was working on essays about hyphens and quo-
tations. As a result, she deserves credit for initiating this work. I take credit
for any mistakes in the pages that follow. Numerous other colleagues in
the Riverside community helped me to conceptualize the project, among
them Alicia Arrizón, Piya Chatterjee, Emory Elliott, Bob Essick, Per-
cival Everett, John Ganim, George Haggerty, Amelia Jones, Katherine
Kinney, Kathleen McHugh, Ethan Nasreddin-Longo, Sally Ness, Eric
Reck, Nancy Rettig, Parama Roy, Paul Simon, and Traise Yamamoto. A
very special thank-you goes to the late Phillip Brett as well as Sue-Ellen
Case and Susan Foster who published an early version of what is now
chapter 3.
Colleagues at George Washington University and in the D.C. area also
lent their enthusiasm and knowledge to this work. I thank my writing
group—Stacy Wolf, Kerric Harvey, and Rosemarie Garland-Thompson,
as well as Chris Sten, Faye Moscowitz, Gayle Wald, Bob McRuer, Jim
Miller, Nicole King, Kim Hall, and Jeri Zulli. Upon moving to Chicago,
I had the good fortune to work with another group of generous col-
leagues. Here, I acknowledge the input of Michael Anania, Mark Canuel,
Lisa Freeman, Jamie Daniel, Lansiné Kaba, Charles Mills, Jim Hall,
Mil-
dred McGinnis, and Dwight McBride. David Lloyd and George Lipsitz
made excellent suggestions on a preliminary draft of the manuscript and
I thank them for their critiques and encouragement.
I thank the librarians at Northwestern, the British Library, the
New-
berry Library, and most especially the St. Bridewell Printing Library
where Nigel Roche and Denise Roughan assisted me greatly. Roman
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