INDEX
activists and activism, 87, 97, 106, 171, 175,
202, 220–21. See also human rights
affect: affective actions, 37, 39; affective
engagement of audience with those on
screen, 68, 72–73, 74, 76, 213; affective
registers, 6, 50, 212–16, 225; affective
spaces and communities, 16, 25; capture of
desire through, 226–27, 266, 273–75, 294,
299–301; family and kinship as affec-
tive forces, 56, 66; food as carrier of, 66;
po liti cal of melodrama, 33, 156, 178, 218,
224–25, 228; queer cinematic, 11, 13–14,
75, 230, 232, 237–38, 257, 296; queerness as
an affective force, 50, 66, 77, 242, 313n48,
332n53; slow- motion capture of, 239;
transnationalism as basis for affective
homosocial bonds, 75, 76, 122, 192, 313n57
Africa: African and pan- African films, 98;
African concept of sex as private, 137, 171;
Batho Ba Lorato Film Festival, 87, 97–101,
316n31; Dakan (Destiny), 32, 132–40,
321n28, 321n33, 321n38; documentaries
concerning lives of lgbt Africans, 98;
Gaurav Desai on repre sentations of
African queerness, 69; homo sexuality as
unAfrican and unnatural, 97, 99, 132, 210,
316–17nn36–37; human rights and lgbt
activism in, 98–99, 101–3, 133; legabibo
(Lesbians, Gays, and Bisexuals of Bo-
tswana), 97–98, 101–3, 316n36, 317nn39–41;
Migraine- George on tradition and
modernity in, 134–35, 321n33; modernity
and modern be hav iors, 137–39, 140; mod-
ernization in, 134–35; Nollywood homo-
sex cycle of films, 171–72, 324n8; North
Africa, 134, 231–32; Out in Africa South
African Gay and Lesbian Film Festival,
81, 110; Panafrican Film and Tele vision
Festival (fespaco), 132; postcolonial
concerns, 132, 133, 313n49, 316n35, 320n26;
Romanow on postcolonial African body,
137, 140, 321n39; scholarship on African
Note: Italicized numbers indicate a figure; n indicates an endnote
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