otes
1
Prolepses
1 Greenblatt, ‘‘Psychoanalysis and Renaissance Culture,’’ 210–24. See
Schiesari’s critique of this essay in The Gendering of Melancholia, 22–26.
I discuss the question of psychoanalysis and Renaissance subjectivity at
greaterlengthin‘‘EarlyModernPsychoanalytics.’’Therearemanyinter-
esting defenses of the use of psychoanalysis for pre- and early moder-
nity;thefollowing,inparticular,haveshapedmythinking:Murrayand
Smith, Repossessions; Mazzio and Trevor, Historicism, Psychoanalysis, and
Early Modern Culture;Dinshaw, Getting Medieval;andFradenburg, Sacrifice
Your Love.
2 Greenblattwrites,‘‘Theconsequence,Ithink,isthatpsychoanalytic
interpretation seems to follow upon rather than to explain Renaissance
texts. . . . Psychoanalytic interpretation is causally belated, even as it is
causallylinked:hencethecuriouseffectofadiscoursethatfunctionsasif
thepsychologicalcategoriesitinvokeswerenotonlysimultaneouswith
but even prior to and themselves the causes of the very phenomena of
which in actual fact they were the results’’ (‘‘Psychoanalysis and Renais-
sance Culture,’’ 221).
3 AccordingtoDollimore,‘‘InEnglishstudiesespeciallythemodern
andtheearlymodernhavebeenerroneouslyconflated.Inparticular,es-
sentialist conceptions of the self which took effective hold only in the
Enlightenment,thentobesubsequentlydevelopedwithin(forinstance)
Romanticism and modernism, have been retrospectively read into the
earlymodernperiod’’(SexualDissidence,279).Forapoststructuralistview
of early modern textual subjectivity, see Cave, The Cornucopian Text.
4 Dollimore, Sexual Dissidence, 280.
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