Notes on the Contributors
JOSIAH BLACKMORE,
coeditor, is Assistant Professor of Portuguese at the Uni-
versity ofToronto and Associate Chair for Portuguese in the university's Depart-
ment ofSpanish and Portuguese. He received his ph.D. from Harvard University
in
1992.
His research and teaching interests center on the culture of medieval and
early modern Portugal, 'with emphasis on the discourses of poetry, history, and
sexuality, as well as representations ofthe forbidden. He has published articles on
medieval Portuguese historiography, and is currently at work on a book-length
study of Portuguese shipwreck narratives entitled Manifest Perdition: Shipwreck
Narratives and the Disruption ofHistoriography, z552-z65z.
LINDE M. BROCATO
is Assistant Professor of Spanish at the University of Illinois
at Urbana-Champaign. She received her ph.D. in comparative literature from
Emory University's Institute of Liberal Arts in
1991.
Since then she has been in-
vestigating fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Spanish literature and philosophy.
Her book, "To Penetrate with Intellectual Eyes": Text, Vision, and Nation in Tras-
tamara Spain, is presently under consideration for publication.
CATHERINE BROWN
is J\ssociate Professor of Romance Languages and Litera-
tures and Comparative Literature at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.
She is the author of Contrary Things: Exegesis, Dialectic, and the Poetics ofDi-
dacticism
(1998)
and of articles on HelOIse, Marie de France, Juan Ruiz's Libro de
buen amor, and Hispanist Ramon Menendez Pidal. She has also published trans-
lations of works by Federico Garcia Lorca. She is currently at work on a book
entitled The Living Letter ofthe Middle Ages.
ISRAEL BURSHATIN
is~lilliamR. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Spanish and Compara-
tive Literature at Haverford College. He has published numerous studies on the
cultural role of Moriscos and Moors in medieval and golden age writing, includ-
ing "Power, Discourse, and Metaphor in the Ahencerraje," in Modern Language
Notes
(1984);
"The Moor in the Text: Metaphor, Emblem, and Silence," in Henry
Louis Gates, Jr., ed., ''Race,'' Writing, and Difference
(1986);
and "Playing the
Moor: Parody and Performance in Lope de Vega's EIprimer Fajardo," in PMLA
(May
1992).
He is currently working on a book-length study of the trial of Eleno
de Cespedes.
DANIEL EISENBERG
is Associate Dean of Liberal Arts at Regents College. He is
the author of numerous studies on Cervantes, Spanish chivalric romances, and
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