It is interesting to contemplate a tangled bank, clothed with many
plants of many kinds, with birds singing on the bushes, with vari-
ous insects flitting about, and with worms crawling through the
damp earth, and to reflect that these elaborately constructed forms,
so different from each other, and dependent upon each other in
so complex a manner, have all been produced by laws acting
around us. . . .  There is grandeur in this view of life, with its sev-
eral powers.—Darwin, On the Origin of Species
Power is a thing of the senses. It lives as a capacity, or a yearning,
or a festering resentment. It can be sensualized in night rages.
Kathleen Stewart, Ordinary Affects
The animal that I am (following), does it speak? . . .  Language is
like the rest—it is not enough to speak of it. From the moment of
this first question, one should be able to sniff the trace of the fact
that this animal seems to speak French here, and is no less asi-
nine for it.—Derrida, The Animal That Therefore I Am
Although this book begins with the religious practices of a few
specific animals, my aim is not to produce a static cata log of
forms of animal religion. Instead, by placing religious studies
into conversation with affect theory, it seeks to intercept and
CO N C L U S I O N
UNDER THE ROSE
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