I N D E X
activism, xi, xv, 106, 117–125, 138, 143n1,
154n5, 217–218; Black women’s, xiii;
hospitality and mothering as, xi, 117;
mysticism in, 168; spirituality and, xvi,
xviii, 209, 217
acu punc ture, 121, 207–208
Adams, Victoria Gray, 171–172
African American exceptionalism,
259–260
African American marching bands and drill
teams, 163, 225
African American sacred music: Tibetan
chanting reminiscent of, 172; transforma-
tive power of, 123
African American ser vicemen: challenging
Jim Crow, 22; discrimination against,
22–23; at uso party 87–90
African Americans, 27, 33, 43–44, 129–133,
140, 222, 251–256; appeal of Mennonite
House to, 127, 130–131, 137; blamed for
nation’s problems, 159; danger, height-
ened sense of, 232–233; dream traditions
of,
61; dying at home, 58; employment
discrimination against, 94–95; formality
of personal relations among, 124; peace
and justice, desire for, 133; wisdom in
strug gle of, 259–260, 268–269
African Traditional Religion, 241
Africans, 165, 268–269; as ancestors, 18; as
original people, 70
Albany (Georgia), 18, 20, 27, 117, 155–156,
164, 269
Albany Movement, the, 15, 18, 123, 157, 269
Altgeld Gardens housing pro ject (Chicago),
75–79, 83–86, 98
Amaterasu (Shinto goddess), 234
American Friends Ser vice Committee
(afsc), 174
Americus (Georgia), xxii, 18, 20, 144–145,
147–148, 254
Amish, 142
Anabaptists, 128, 130
Anderson, Elizabeth Harris (Aunt Itty), 108
angels, xxi, 113, 122, 144, 176
Anzaldúa, Gloria, xx
Arendt, Hannah, xii
Arky, Ronald, 201–203, 208, 210, 216
Atlanta (Georgia): Rosemarie’s move to,
xii, 16–18, 127–128; as hub for Movement
activity, 135, 140
Atlanta University, 189
axé (ashé), 213, 262
Aztec dance, 225
Baha’i, 157, 171
Bailey, Kofi, xii
Baker, Ella, 118, 223, 235, 259, 170
Banks Funeral Home, 59
Banyacya, Thomas, xiv
Barbados, 70
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