Foreword
The first edition of this book marked the beginning of Daniel Nugent's
intellectual career; the publication of the second edition marks its unex-
pected end. Daniel died, suddenly and much too soon, while the
book was
In press.
Reading again the essays in this book, along with the new introduction
and Adolfo Gilly's conclusion, we can place this effort in relation to
Daniel's other contributions. Setting aside some of his articles and the
edited book with John Calagione and Doris Francis (Workers' Expressions,
1992), we have his historical ethnography of Namiquipa (Spent Cartridges
ofRevolution,
1993), a second edited book on popular culture and practice
in relation to fields of power (Everyday Forms
of
State Formation,
1994,
edited with Gilbert Joseph), and a substantial record of his editorial work
with the Journal
ofHistorical
Sociology and, less actively, with Critique
of
Anthropology. With these introductory lines,
I
want to consider, first, the
remarkably coherent and innovative intellectual and political project that
connects this book with Spent Cartridges and Everday Forms, and, second,
the creative and stimulating editorial practice he brought to this book
along with Everyday Forms and the journals.
The intellectual and political project is given clear expression in Daniel's
introduction:
Social groups such as the "peasantry" or the "rural working class" ... do not exist
in a social and historical vacuum. They are connected to global structures ofpower.
At the same time, through the modalities oftheir own structure, they give expres-
sion to global structures of power. However this "giving expression to" does not
operate only in one direction. Rural revolt for instance also affects or is "expressed
in" global structures ofpower; there is a multidirectional character to this articula-
tion. The "expression" of rural revolt and forms of popular mobilization in global
structures ofpower is as important a determinant of historical process as the more
routinely recognized manner in which global structures of power are expressed in
rural revolt. If the former expression is more opaque than the latter, I suspect the
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