Contributors
DANIEL NUGENT
taught anthropology and Latin American history at the Uni-
versities of Arizona, California, and Texas and was a Managing Editor of the
Journal
ofHistorical
Sociology
until his death in November 1997. His publications
include
Spent Cartridges
ofRevolution:
An Anthropological History
ofNamiquipa,
Chihuahua
(1993);
Worker's Expressions: Beyond Accommodation and Resistance
(co-edited with John Calagione and Doris Francis, 1992); and
Everyday Forms
of
State Formation: Revolution and the Negotiation
ofRule
in Modern Mexico
(co-
edited with Gilbert Joseph, 1994). Beyond publishing the results of his research
on rural Mexico in
Critique
ofAnthropology,
the
Monthly Review,
and elsewhere,
he is co-author, with Joan Holden, Paula Loera, and Eva Tessler, of the play
I]
Dias/I] Days: How the New Zapatistas Shook the World,
which toured the U.S.A.
in 1996-97.
ANA MARfA ALONSO
teaches anthropology at the University of Arizona. In the
1980s she conducted ethnographic and archival research in Mexico and the
United States, later holding postdoctoral fellowships at the Pembroke Center for
Teaching and Research on Women (Brown University) and the Southwest In-
stitute for Research on Women (University of Arizona). She is the author of
Thread
ofBlood:
Colonialism, Revolution and Gender on Mexico's Northern Frontier
(1995) and of articles on popular resistance, social memory, historical anthropol-
ogy, gender, and ethnicity.
JOHN COATSWORTH
is Monroe Gutman Professor ofLatin American Affairs at
Harvard University, where he also serves as Director of the David Rockefeller
Center for Latin American Studies. He is the author of numerous works on
Mexican and Latin American economic, social, and international history. A
collection ofhis articles on Mexican economic history appeared in Mexico under
the title
Los origenes del atraso: Nueve ensayos de historia econ6mica de Mexico, siglos
XVIIIy XIX (1990). His most recent book,
The United States and CentralAmer-
ica: The Clients and the Colossus
(1994) surveyed U.S.-Central American rela-
tions, focusing on the period since World War II.
ADOLFO GILLY
is a historian and essayist, and a professor on the Facultad de
Ciencias Politicas y Sociales at the
UNAM.
Over the past decade he has also
taught or worked in the United States at the University of Chicago, Columbia
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