notes
Introduction
1 
Williams, Television: Technology and Cultural Form, 59.
2 
Debord, Society of the Spectacle, 7.
3 
Williams, Hard Core: Power, Pleasure and the ‘Frenzy of the Visible,’ 281. See
also Porn Studies, 3.
4 
See Escoffier’s introduction to his excellent anthology of documents, Sexual
Revolution, pp. xi-xxxvi.
5 
Giddens, The Transformation of Intimacy: Sexuality, Love and Eroticism in
Modern Societies; D’Emilio and Freedman, Intimate Matters: A History of Sexu-
ality in America; Luker, When Sex Goes to School: Warring Views on Sex—And Sex
Education—Since the Sixties.
6 
Luker, 76–77.
7 
See Kristin Luker’s discussion of the difference between these revolutions,
pp. 37–79.
8 
In Hard Core I understood the emergence of hard-core pornography in the
early seventies as part of the phenomenon described by Michel Foucault: an his-
torically new “immense curiosity about sex, bent on questioning it, with an insa-
tiable desire to hear it speak . . . .” Foucault’s point is that sex is a discursive con-
struct more than it is a preexisting object. Foucault, The History of Sexuality: An
Introduction, Volume 1, 178; Williams, Hard Core, 2.
9 
Eric Schaefer makes this argument in his forthcoming book, Massacre of
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