INDEX

Abortion, 68, 72, 74–75, 77, 87, 95–97,
99, 103, 105, 107–9, 112, 114, 116, 119,
120; as contraception, 101–12; and de-
clining fertility, 101; forced, 227; in Ire-
land, 122 n.5; marriage as prerequisite
for, 228; moral burden of, 230–33; nar-
ratives, 106–11; research in Greece on,
122 n.2; silences surrounding, 108; and
sterility, 101, 105, 107; as symbol, 107;
in Tibet, 223, 229–33, 235; violence of,
106, 109
Abuse, domestic, 197
Adultery, 135–36, 219, 238 n.3
Alis, 270, 284, 302 n.12
Amin, Idi, 144, 149, 155 n.5
Amniocentesis, 37
Anthropometry, 79, 81–83, 86
Asli, 164, 173, 176
Bai, Goda, 297–99, 301
Bengali culture, 190–91
Berdache, 6
Beshya, 192
Bhadralok, 189–93, 196, 203
Bhadramahila, 190–93, and anxiety over
chastity, 191–92; Westernization of,
192
Bhartiya nari, 197–98
Biopolitics, 159
Biopower, 32 n.20
Birth control, 71–72, 74, 91, 93 n.1, 94
n.7, 95, 100–101, 103–5, 111, 114, 119–
20, 151–52, 163, 173, 229–30; and the
‘‘family principle,’’ 172; Indonesian
state-sponsored, 167, 172; and mar-
riage, 174–75; and middle-class values,
172; and parallel ideologies of using,
175; restrictive policies for, 228; in Ti-
betan medicine, 231; use in Greece, 122
nn.2–4. See also Family Planning
Bisexuals, economic, 251–53, 259
Body, discourses of the, 100; ethical, 100,
118
Bombay Dost collective, 281–82, 299;
and Hamsafar, 292–95, 301
Brideprice, 166–67, 169
Buddhism: and conception, 237 n.1; Ti-
betan tantric, 207; Tibetan Vajrayana,
209
Burton, Richard, 279, 294, 296
Capital, symbolic: and self-presentation,
253
Celibacy: as ‘‘bourgeois,’’ 229; forced re-
nouncement of, 227; and Tibetan the-
ocratic discipline, 211–12, 214, 218–19,
221
Chags pa, 216, 223
Child lending, 132, 134
Chopel, Gedun, 218–22, 232, 238 n.6
Circumcision, male, 133, 156 n.15
Commonsense sex, 159–60, 165, 171,
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