Notes
I
Parasites and Perrerts: An Introduction
to Gothic Monstrosity
I
Jean Baudrillard, ''The Ecstasy of Communication," in The Anti-Aesthetic: Essays on
Postmodem Culture, ed. Hal Foster (Port Townsend, Wash.: Bay Press,
1983), 130.
Baudrillard writes: "Obscenity begins precisely when there is no more spectacle, no
more scene, when
all
becomes transparence and inImediate visibility, when everything
is exposed to the harsh and inexorable light of information and communication?'
2
Linda Williams, Hard Core: Puwer, Pleasure and the «Frenzy of the Visible" (Berkeley and
Los Angeles: University of California Press,
1989).
Michel Foucault, Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison, trans. Alan Sheridan
(New York: Vintage,
1979), 30, 29.
4 See, for example, Edith Birkhead, The Tale of Terror: A Study of the Gothic Romance
(New York: Russell and Russell,
1963);
Montague Summers, The Gothic Quest: A
History
of
Gothic (New York: Russell and Russell,
1938);
David Punter, The Literature
of Terror: A History
of
Gothic Fictions from
I76s
to the Present Day (London: Longman,
1980).
5 This term is coined by Marjorie Garber in Vested Interests: Cross-Dressing and Cultural
Anxiety (New York: Routledge,
1992), 16. In
this study of transvestism, Garber
suggests that the cross-dresser and the transsexual provoke category crises that are
displaced onto the place of gender ambiguity. This argument is useful to the claim that
I make that
all
difference in modernity has been subsumed under the aegis of sexual
difference.
6 Most notable, for my purposes, among such studies are N aney Armstrong's Desire and
Domestic Fiction: A Political History of the Novel (New York and Oxford: Oxford Uni-
versity Press,
1987)
and David A. Miller's The Novel and the Police (Berkeley and Los
Angeles: University of California Press,
1988).
7 See Michelle A. Masse,In The Name of Love: Women, Mnsochism and the Gothic (Ithaca
and London: Cornell University Press,
1992).
Masse's study looks at the intersections
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