Notes
Introduction
1 Joni Martin, “Women on the Waves: Surf Vacations for Women Fulfill
Gidget Fantasies,” San Francisco Chronicle, 22 September 2002; Charis
Atlas Heelan, “Surf Girls Rule: Riding the Big Kahuna in Bikinis,” From-
mer’s, 4 September 2004, www.frommers.com. Reviews of Las Olas
have appeared in Oprah; Travel Woman; Elle; Self, Body, and Soul; Surf
Life for Women; Harper’s Bazaar; Sports Illustrated for Women; Women
Sports and Fitness; Spa; Shape; Time; Newsweek; Condé Nast Traveler;
and Travel and Leisure. See the media section of the Las Olas Web site,
www.surflasolas.com.
2 For one of many Web sites designed to attract U.S. investment, see
Avalos Sayulita Realty, www.move2sayulita.com.
3 For visuals of Villa Amor, see the Villa Amor Web site (www.villaamor
.com).
4 Carroll, “Boom!!!,” 98.
5 More recently, the business has expanded and goes under the name
“Manifesta Retreats,” encompassing “golf safaris” and “artistic safa-
ris.” But in 2002 the “Manifesta” appeared as an explicit manifesto
published online detailing the Las Olas mission. My interviews with
Bev Sanders reinforced the mission statement (Sanders, conversation
with the author, 22–24 October 2002, 24–30 November 2002). Chapter
3 takes up these matters in full.
6 Sanders, promotional brochure, 2002.
7 Ibid.
8 Peralta, Dogtown and Z- Boys.
9 On “responsible tourism,” see the International Center for Responsible
Tourism at Leeds Metropolitan University (www.icrtourism.org).
10 With the language of the “new” new social movement, I suggest post-
identity political formations that formulate strategic goals for ex-
plicitly globalist or transnational contexts. For a survey of theories
of social movements that distinguish between what might be called
“theories of mobilization” focusing on the “how” of gaining specific
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