Index
Abbade, joao, 147
Abolition: British, 53; comparative,
2-3, 33-34; economic effects on,
31-
32; French, 35-36; legislation
of, 34, 42; models for, 35, 44; poli-
tics of, in Brazil, United States,
Cuba, 4; popular coalitions in, 53;
pressure for, in Brazil, Great Brit-
ain, United States, 33; Spanish and
Spanish-American, 36
Abolitionist movement: after abolition,
6,53-54
Abolitionist societies: formation of, 24
Acoboclades, 144
Agregados, 57, 64
o
Alfinete, 106
Alliances: of former slaves, 15, 20
Almanack Laemmert, 61 n.20, 62, 63,
64,
71,
73,
76
Amazonas, 32
American Federation of Labor, 91 n. 13
o
Amigo do Poco,92, 94
Andrade Cuimaraes, General Artur
Oscar
de,
151
Andrews, George Reid, 7- 8, 9, 19
Antonio, Irmao. See Conselheiro,
Antonio
Aparecido, Santos Antonio. See
Conselheiro, Antonio
Assuncao [Vilanova], Antonio Fran-
cisco de, 149-50
Autonomy: as culturally variable
concept, 16- 17
Avanti!, 92, 110
Bahia: police in, 50-51, 134; slave-
holders in, 42; unrest in, during
time of Antonio Conselheiro, 134;
workers in,
8
Baixas, Norberto das, 149
Barbosa, RUi, 154
Barman, Roderick
J.,
165
Batista, Padre Cicero Bornao, 126
Beatos, 124-25
Beiguelman, Paula, 97
Bell, Rudolph, 102,
III
Belo Monte, 119, 131, 142, 150,
165- 66
Benta, Aunt, 142
Biological determinism, 48, 89, 122,
141,
153
Black newspapers: view of Sao Paulo
black community in, 104. See also
News media
Black workers: change in stereotypes
of, 93, 115; characteristics and skills
of, 101, 102, 103; before immigra-
tion, 101;jobs open to, in 1920,
99-100; in rural and urban econo-
mies, 96-98; stereotypes of 8, 89,
104. See also Former slaves
Brazil: abolition in, 24, 36-37; com-
pared to other slaveholding socie-
ties, 23; demographic shifts in
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