s ources and p ermissions
Part I
“The Earliest Africans in North America,” from Peter H. Wood, “The Earliest Africans
in North America,” in Strange New Land: Africans in Colonial America (New York: Oxford
University Press, 2002), 1–2. Reprinted with permission of Oxford University Press,
Inc.
“Black Pioneers: The Spanish-Speaking Afro-Americans of the Southwest,” from
Jack D. Forbes, “Black Pioneers: The Spanish-Speaking Afroamericans of the South-
west,” Phylon 7, no. 3 (1966): 233–46. Reprinted with permission of Clark Atlanta Uni-
versity.
“Slave and Free Women of Color in the Spanish Ports of New Orleans, Mobile, and
Pensacola,” from Virginia Meacham Gould, “‘A Chaos of Iniquity and Discord’: Slave
and Free Women of Color in the Spanish Ports of New Orleans, Mobile, and Pensacola,”
in The Devil’s Lane: Sex and Race in the Early South, edited by Catherine Clinton and Michele
Gillespie (New York: Oxford University Press, 1997), 232–45. Reprinted with permis-
sion of Oxford University Press, Inc.
“Afro-Cubans in Tampa,” from Susan D. Greenbaum, More Than Black: Afro-Cubans in
Tampa, New World Diasporas Series (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2002),
58–60, 68–72, 82–84. Reprinted with permission of the University Press of Florida.
“Pulling the Muse from the Drum,” from Adrián Castro, Cantos to Blood and Honey
(St. Paul, Minn.: Coffee House Press, 1997), 40–42. Reprinted with permission of the
author.
Part II
“Racial Integrity: A Plea for the Establishment of a Chair of Negro History in Our
Schools and Colleges,” from Arthur A. Schomburg, Negro Society for Historical Re-
search, Occasional Paper No. 3 (Yonkers, N.Y.: August Valentine Bernier, 1913).
Part III
“Black Cuban, Black American,” from Evelio Grillo, Black Cuban, Black American (Hous-
ton: Arte Público Press, 2000), 6–17, 62–71. Reprinted with permission of the pub-
lisher, © 2000 Arte Público Press, University of Houston.
Previous Page Next Page