NOTES
INTRODUCTION
For a primarily political survey of the period from the national and Parisian per-
spective, see Andre Kaspi et al., La Liberation de la France) juin 1944-janvier 1946
(Paris: Perrin,
1995).
2
Hoffmann goes further to say that at the liberation "each man, each family, each
village or town tended to become a little sovereign island again" (Hoffmann, De-
cline or Renewal? France since the 1930S [New York: Viking,
1974], 56).
3 Maurice Larkin, France since the Popular Front: Government and People) 1936-1986
(Oxford: Clarendon Press,
1988), II7,
and Frances M. B. Lynch, France and the
International Economy: From Vichy to the Treaty of Rome (London: Routledge,
1997),7-8.
4
See Kaspi for the political demands faced by the Gaullists, especially the Ameri-
can insistence on early elections
(50-60).
5
Henry Rousso, The Vichy Syndrome: History and Memory in France since 1944) trans.
Arthur Goldhammer (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press,
1991), 15-18.
6
The major works in the expanding field of Vichy France include Philippe Bur-
rin, La France it fheure allemande) 1940-1944 (Paris: Editions du Seuil,
1995);
H. R. Kedward, In Search of the Maquis: Rural Resistance in Southern France)
1942-1944 (Oxford: Clarendon,
1993);
H. R. Kedward, Resistance in Vichy France
(Oxford: Oxford University Press,
1978);
Pierre Laborie, IlOpinion franfaise sous
Vichy (Paris: Editions du Seuil,
1990);
Robert O. Paxton, Vichy France: Old Guard
and New Order) 1940-1944 (New York: Columbia University Press,
1972);
and
John Sweets, Choices in Vichy France: The French under Nazi Occupation (Oxford:
Oxford University Press,
1986).
7
Pieter Lagrou, "Victims of Genocide and National Memory: Belgium, France
and the Netherlands,
1945-1965:'
Past and Present
154 (1997): 194-97.
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