ACIJIOWLEDGMErrrI
My journey through six countries in ten years accumulated enormous profes-
sional debts that not even the Money Doctor could help me repay.
For funding I am indebted to the Joint Committee on Latin American
Studies of the Social Science Research Council and
to
the Latin American
Program of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. During my
stay in the Castle, the Wilson Center staff was highly supportive, especially
Abraham F. Lowenthal and Alexander Wilde. The University of Illinois, Ur-
bana-Champaign, where I enjoyed thirteen years on the faculty, also financed
part of this research, through a paid sabbatical and through grants from its
Research Board and its Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies. That
center's secretary, Dorothy Osborne, gave me constant encouragement and
typing assistance. My new home, the University of California at San Diego,
supported the final stages, while Lee Dewey skillfully processed these words.
Through these institutions I benefited from industrious and thoughtful research
assistants: Mark E. Brewster, Orlando Pacheco, Baldomero Estrada, Marcus
Joaquim Maciel de Carvalho, Gerardo Munck, and Wendy Prentice.
The research in the United States began in the University of Illinois library,
where I received the guidance of Carl Deal, Nelly Gonzalez, and Sara de Mundo
Lo. In Washington, D.C., extensive work was conducted in the National Ar-
chives and the Library of Congress. Even more important were the Edwin
Walter Kemmerer Papers in Princeton University's Seeley G. Mudd Manu-
script Library. There, Donald L. Kemmerer, Edwin's son, first granted me
access, and the curator, Nancy Bressler, extended every courtesy.
Indeed, no one provided as much help with the overall project as did Don
Kemmerer. In an extremely professional and generous manner he shared with
me his father's papers, transcriptions from his diary, personal and bibliographic
leads, and reminiscences ofthe man and the missions. Unlike some descendants
of famous parents, Don never tried
to
restrict my investigation or influence my
judgments. Although he may not agree with this book's interpretations, I hope
he finds them scholarly and fair.
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