Notes
introduction
1 Alfred, Wasáse, 19.
2 Kikiloi, “Rebirth of an Archipelago,” 75.
3 Kuleana is described as “right, privilege, concern, responsibility, title, business,
property, estate, portion, jurisdiction, authority, liability, interest, claim,
owner ship, tenure, affair, province; reason, cause, function, justification; small
piece of property, as within an ahupuaʻa; blood relative through whom a
relationship to less close relatives is traced, as to in- laws.” Pukui and Elbert,
Hawaiian Dictionary, s.v., “kuleana.”
4 Bush, “Olelo Hoakaka,” Jan. 6, 1893, 1.
5 Oliveira, “Wahi a Kahiko,” 101.
6 Oliveira, “Wahi a Kahiko,” 102.
7 Kameʻeleihiwa, Native Land and Foreign Desires.
8 hoʻomanawanui, Voices of Fire.
9 Oliveira, Ancestral Places, 1.
10 P. Kanahele, Ka Honua Ola, 1.
11 Brown, Facing the Spears, 27.
12 Perkins, “Kuleana,” 14–27.
13 Kimura, “Ke Au Hawaiʻi.”
14 Kanepuu, “Ka Poe Kakau Moolelo.”
15 Alfred, Wasáse.
16 Warrior, Tribal Secrets, 87.
17 Warrior, Tribal Secrets, 97–98 .
18 Warrior, Tribal Secrets, 88.
19 Warrior, Tribal Secrets, 90.
20 Kanepuu, “He Moolelo no Kanewailani,” Feb. 20, 1868, 4.
21 Holt, Waimea Summer, 172.
22 Meyer, Hoʻoulu, 166. Meyer interviewed kūpuna with whom she established
affectionate relationships; thus she calls them mentors rather than the more
distancing and inappropriate term “in for mant” (141).
23 Kikiloi, “Rebirth of an Archipelago,” 74.
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