C O N C L U S I O N
Bnot
ut (like his nineteenth-century namesake) Canek can-
have the last word . . .
His axiomatic statement—nothing ever changes—is
really a statement about the priority of structure over
event. The basic structure of lucha libre has not changed
since the 1930s. Rudos and técnicos still face each other in
their violent tango. As Novo described in the 1940s, ‘‘each
rheumatic and bald master of a two peso ticket at ringside
[still] loses the kilos and years necessary to transform him-
self [(or herself)] into [Rayo de Jalisco Jr.], and with equal
ease, find in [Dr. Wagner Jr.] or in [SuperElektra] his ene-
mies scattered about the world . . . and contributes from
his seat to exterminate them, to kick them, to throw them
out of the ring’’ (Novo 1994: 600).
As always, the fate of the wrestlers depends on the loy-
alties, preferences, and backstage maneuvers of the pro-
moters who organize the sport, the commission that regu-
lates it, and the various media through which their battles
and news of their battles circulate. Like lucha libre, Canek
implies, the structure of political power in Mexico never
changes. Despite the appearance of change, the same peo-
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