Index
Acevedo Cárdenas, Conrado, 76–7 7
Acosta Meza, Manuel, 367
Activism, 86, 190– 93
Addiction, to Tijuana, 48
Agua Caliente Casino, 55, 138– 39,
279
Agua Caliente Racetrack, 54, 137– 38
El agua de la presa (1985), 39
Alcohol: consumption, in Tijuana,
311; prohibition of, 54, 75, 138– 39
Amparo, 200
Ángel Morales, Miguel, 30
Angel Palou, Pedro, 40
Antiglobal city, Tijuana as, 118– 20
Antin, David, 58
Apocalyptic ction, 40
Apuntes de una fugitiva, 66
Architecture: of Agua Caliente
Casino, 138; Mexitlán, 271– 75;
practice of, 175–7 7; Pueblo Amigo
Palenque, 270– 71; of Tijuana Rock,
123– 24
Archetypes, in Tijuana, 49– 50, 54
Arellano, Eduardo, 27
Arellano, Ramon and Benjamin, 366
Arellano Félix cartel, 364– 66
Arreola, Monica, 229– 30
Art, artists: approaches to, 220– 27;
collaboration, 232– 36; constraints
of, 110– 11; ethnographically
related, 111– 13; investment in
Tijuana, 282; involving local
organizations, 115; literature, 231;
mixed media, 264; perceptions,
realities, of Tijuana, 314– 15;
photography, 227– 30; relational,
113– 14; spreading infl uence of,
109– 10, 113; study of, 95– 97; and
Tlazoltéotl replicas, 268– 70;
venues in Tijuana, 284; yonke art
party, 1– 2; young, 317– 19. See also
Cinema; Literature
Artifacts, Mesoamerican: Cather-
wood on, 271; as landmarks, 275;
passive displays of, 76–7 7;
replicas, as cultural anchors,
265– 69; in Tijuana, 273, 276
Attraction, of Tijuana, 56–5 8
Augustín, José, 321
Avenida Revolución: about, 123– 24;
establishment of place for, 117– 18;
as idealized Mexico, 126– 27;
portrayed in literature, 36, 37
Baja California: export pro cessing in,
73– 79; and globalization, 71–7 3;
history of, 74–7 6; wine industry
of, 138
Bajalta, 103– 4
Ballads. See Corridos
Baltz, Lewis, 48
La Bamba (1987), 33
Bátiz, Baby, 331
Bátiz, Javier, 330– 31
Benedición (poem), 37
Berumen, Humberto Félix, 280
Blancornelas, Jesús, 309– 10, 363
Border Industrialization Program
(bip), 194
Borderism, North and South of:
Anglo- Americans’ view of
Mexicans, 278– 79; Crosthwaite’s
parody of, 131; defi ned, 278;
southern Mexico’s view of Tijuana,
280–8 1; U.S. perception of Mexico
as, 124– 25
Border(s): advantages of life on,
332– 34; changes in conceptualiza-
tion of, 96–9 7; crimogenic
conditions at, 364–6 5; crossings
of, 61
Previous Page Next Page