notes
preface
1.
Graves, ‘‘It’s a Queer Time,’’ hereafter cited in text by line number.
2.
See Chauncey, Gay New York.
3.
Nora, ‘‘Between Memory and History,’’ 9.
4.
On alternative temporal schemae, see Boellstorf, A Coincidence of Desires.
5.
Foucault, ‘‘The Life of Infamous Men,’’ 77.
6.
The best description of this aspect of Sedgwick’s work can be found in Stock-
ton, ‘‘Eve’s Queer Child.’’
7.
Crimp, ‘‘Mourning and Militancy,’’ 18, his emphasis.
8.
I refer to the trajectory from part 2, chapter 3 of Butler’s Gender Trouble titled
‘‘Freud and the Melancholia of Gender’’ to her book The Psychic Life of Power.
9.
Moraga, Giving Up the Ghost.
10.
While it would be easy enough to cite Edelman’s No Future as the synecdoche
for this kind of work, I’m also referring to my own piece with Berlant, ‘‘Queer
Nationality,’’ whose ending section on zines celebrates negation.
11.
Sedgwick, ‘‘Paranoid Reading and Reparative Reading.’’
12.
This sentence channels three very important theories of, respectively, past-
ness, futurity, and lateral movements in and with time: Love, Feeling Backward;
Muñoz, Cruising Utopia; and Stockton, ‘‘Growing Sideways, or Versions of the
Queer Child.’’
13.
Sedgwick, ‘‘Paranoid Reading,’’ 8, her emphasis.
14.
Derrida, Specters of Marx, 38.
15.
The phrase ‘‘epidemic of signification’’ is Treichler’s; see How to Have Theory
in an Epidemic, 11 and passim. act up’s signs, fliers, stickers, and T-shirts often
relied on resignifying dominant phrases or images. See Crimp and Rolston, aids
DemoGraphics.
16.
La Planche and Pontalis, ‘‘Binding,’’ 50–51. For an elegant discussion of
Freudian ‘‘binding’’ in relation to narrative and sexuality, see Tuhkanen, ‘‘Binding
the Self.’’
17.
I thank one of my anonymous readers from Duke University Press for this
formulation.
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