Notes
PREFACE
I Wilford,
'~cient
Graves of Armed Women Hint at Amazons," B7.
2 Freud, "The 'Uncanny,' " 17: 245.
INTRODUCTION
I Foucault, The History
of
Sexuality, liOlume
1,
43.
2
Bray, Homosexuality in Renaissance England, 16. See also Bredbeck, Sodomy and Interpretation,
xi; Bruce Smith, Homosexual Desire,
IO-U;
Goldberg, Sodometries, 22; Traub, Desire and
Anxiety, 1lI-13; Orgel, Impersonations, 37-42; Masten, Textual Intercourse, 5-7.
3 For an account of the legal status of sodomy in early modern England and an analy-
sis of the relative infrequency of successful prosecution, see Bruce Smith, Homosexual
Desire, esp. 41-53'
4 Scott,
Gender
and the Politics
of
History,
2.
5
Paster, The Bo4Y Embarrassed, 234. For her discussion of amazonian monomasty as a
figure for the early modern infant's experience of inadequate or dangerous nurture,
see 234-38. See also Schwarz, "Missing the Breast."
6 Oso'rio, Five Bookes, 25V.
7
Dollimore, Sexual Dissidence, 239. See also Bredbeck, who observes, "The entrance of
sodomy into idealized languages of social order somehow also invokes the broader
arenas of dissent trying to be controlled" (Sodomy and Interpretation, 21).
8 Traub, Desire and Anxiety, 112-13. See also Scott's useful discussion of the evolution of
"gender" as an analytic term, in
Gender
and the Politics
of
History, esp. 31-33.
9 Sedgwick, Between Men, 25.
10 Judith Butler, Bodies That Matter, xi, 3.
II Bray, "Homosexuality and the Signs of Male Friendship"; Rambuss, Cleser Devotions;
Stephens, The Limits
of
Eroticism, 19; Traub, "The Perversion of 'Lesbian' Desire"; Bruce
Smith, Homosexual Desire, 20; Masten, Textual Intercourse, 9.
12 Goldberg, Queering the Renaissance, 6.
13 Bredbeck, Sodomy and Interpretation, 108.
14 Traub, Desire and Anxiety; Goldberg, Sodometrns,
22.
IS Bruce Smith, Homosexual Desire, 13.
16 Dollimore, Sexual Dissidence, 33. Dollimore defines transgressive reinscription as "a
mode of transgression which seeks not an escape from existing structures but rather
a subversive reinscription within them, and in the process their dislocation or dis-
placement" (285).
17 Lacan, "The Agency of the Letter in the Unconscious or Reason since Freud," 166.
18 Belsey, Sbakespeare and tbe Loss
of
Eden, 8.
19 Barthes, Mytholegies, 142.
20
A number of scholars have argued for close connections between contemporary lit-
erary theory and early modern texts. See, for example, Belsey, Shakespeare and the Loss
of
Eden,
esp. 25; Bredbeck, Sodomy and Interpretation, esp. 94; Parker, Literary Fat Ladies,
1-7,
esp. 5, and her introduction to Sbakespeare and the Question
of
Theory, vii-xiii; and Quint's
introduction to Literary Theory/Renaissance Texts, 1-19, esp. 6-7.
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