Index
Abbaye de Thélème (Paris), 75, 88–89
Abbey, Don, 103
Abbott, Helen, 193–94, 204
Abbott, Robert S., 179–80, 182, 192–95,
197–98, 203–5, 230, 231, 237; on Mãe
Preta monument, 222–29, 233. See also
Chicago Defender
Abolitionists, 6–7, 9, 76, 221, 232, 297 n.  8.
See also Slavery (African)
Abreu, Martha, 276 n.  78
“Absent presence,” 53, 72, 90
Acioly (musician), 107
Advertising (of coffee), 4, 8, 9, 13–66, 235,
236; consumer citizenship in, 15–18, 20–
27, 33, 43, 49–50, 61–63; erasure of Bra-
zil in later, 44, 51–53, 57, 59, 61, 66, 178;
financial aspects of joint campaign by
Brazil and United States, 26, 57–58, 236,
258 n.  122; gender in, 13–15, 26, 29–31,
35–37, 42, 48, 50, 61–63; magazines for,
22; Orientalism in, 144–45; on radio, 23,
61–63; as source material for scholars,
23–24; tours as part of, 126. See also Cof-
fee; Coffee trade
African Americans: attempts by, to com-
pare blackness across national contexts,
6, 120, 139, 144, 183; Brazilians’ views of,
188–205, 311 n.  112; in coffee ads, 29–33;
foreign language fluency of, 111, 149–50,
153–55, 160, 164; global vision of, 3, 183;
interest of, in Brazil as place of racial
harmony, 8–10, 120, 135, 147, 158, 179–80,
192–93, 195–98, 204–5, 222–25; segrega-
tion for, in Rio de Janeiro, 111, 131–32,
135, 192; as term, xvii; use of exoticism
by, 136–78; violence against, 10, 30, 57,
71, 91, 155, 166, 188, 198–200, 202–3, 217,
218, 224, 227–28, 234; work open to
female, 160. See also Africans and Afro-
descendents; Afro-diasporic forms and
traditions; Citizenship; Jazz; “Negro
vogue”; Pan-Africanism; Racism; Segre-
gation; Slavery; Names of specific African
Americans
African diaspora studies, xiii, xiv, xvii
Os africanos no Brasil (Nina Rodrigues), 195
Africans and Afro-descendents: as back-
ward and primitive, 122–23, 187, 216;
Brazilian immigration policy on, 195–
98; common history of, 190–91; as
cultural producers claiming author-
ship and public space, 90–91, 95, 116–
24; erasure of influence of, in cultural
performances, 71, 72, 83–84, 113–15; as
exotic, 144; in France in First World
War, 1, 9–10, 79, 87, 105, 192, 232, 319
n.  79; influence of, on Brazil, 72, 83–85,
104, 113–16, 122–23, 127, 170, 187, 209–11,
213–17, 231; in Latin America, 37. See also
African Americans; African diaspora
studies; Afro-Brazilians; Afro-diasporic
forms and traditions; Exoticism; Pan-
Africanism; Race; Slavery; Specific Afri-
can countries
Afro-American (term), xvii–xviii. See also
African Americans; Afro-Brazilians
Afro-Brazilians: attempts by, to compare
blackness across national contexts, 6,
120, 183; expressions of national loyalty
and denial of racism by, 179–80, 185, 187,
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