Notes to Introduction  237
326–346; Alana Chazan, “Good Vibrations: Liberating Sexuality from the Commercial
Regulation of Sexual Devices,” Texas Journal of Women and the Law 18, no. 2 (2009):
263–305; Karthik Subramanian, “It’s a Dildo in 49 States, but It’s a Dildon’t in Alabama:
Alabama’s Anti-­obscenity Enforcement Act and the Assault on Civil Liberty and Per-
sonal Freedom,” Alabama Civil Rights and Civil Liberties Law Review 1, no. 111 (2011):
111–139.
27. Lynn Raridon, interview with author, March 26, 2002.
28. Claire Cavanah, interview with author, August 30, 2001.
29. Joani Blank, “Closing Keynote Plenary” (Catalyst Con West, Burbank, Califor-
nia, September 13, 2015).
30. For discussions regarding private versus public representations of sexuality, see
Jane Juffer, At Home with Pornography: Women, Sex, and Everyday Life (New York: New
York University Press, 1998); Dangerous Bedfellows, Policing Public Sex: Queer Politics
and the Future of aids Activism (Boston, MA: South End, 1996).
31. Aileen Journey, interview with author, October 25, 1998.
32. For discussion of these debates, see Bronstein, Battling Pornography; Lisa Dug-
gan and Nan Hunter, Sex Wars: Sexual Dissent and Political Culture (New York: Rout-
ledge, 1995); Carole Vance, Pleasure and Danger: Exploring Female Sexuality (New
York: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1984).
33. Originally named Toys in Babeland, the company rebranded in 2005 and
dropped the “Toys in.” According to Babeland cofounder Rachel Venning, “We wanted
to get away from being just about toys and identify as a place of sexual empowerment.”
Rachel Venning, e-­mail message to author, June 4, 2015.
34. Lisa Henderson, “Sexuality, Cultural Production, and Foucault” (paper pre-
sented at Sexuality after Foucault, Manchester University, Manchester, U.K., Novem-
ber 2003).
35. For analyses of the making of tv talk shows, see Josh Gamson, Freaks Talk Back:
Tabloid Talk Shows and Sexual Nonconformity (Chicago: University of Chicago Press,
1998); Laura Grindstaff, The Money Shot: Crass, Class, and the Making of tv Talk Shows
(Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2002). For discussions regarding the making
of consumer markets, see Katherine Sender, Business, Not Politics: The Making of the
Gay Market (New York: Columbia University Press, 2004); Arlene Davila, Latinos, Inc.:
The Marketing and Making of a People (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2001).
For an examination of the making of Ms. magazine, see Amy Erdman Farrell, Yours in
Sisterhood: Ms. Magazine and the Promise of Popular Feminism (Chapel Hill: University
of North Carolina Press, 1998).
36. For examples, see Mireille Miller-­Young, A Taste for Brown Sugar: Black Women
in Pornography (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2014); Margot Weiss, Techniques
of Pleasure: bdsm and the Circuits of Sexuality (Durham, NC: Duke University Press,
2011); Barb G. Brents, Crystal A. Jackson, and Kate Hausbeck, The State of Sex: Tourism,
Sex, and Sin in the New American Heartland (New York: Routledge, 2010); Katherine
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