conclusion
BIOMETRIC FAILURE AND BEYOND

In the world of security and intelligence, there is no cost-benefit analysis.
WESLEY WARK, QUOTED IN ‘‘$24B SPENT ON SECURITY IN CANADA SINCE 9/11’’
There are costs to clarity at all costs.
ERIC EISENSBERG, ‘‘BUILDING A MYSTERY: TOWARD A NEW THEORY OF
COMMUNICATION AND IDENTITY’’
The inclusion of biometric technologies in a wide range of state-funded
and commercial applications continues to grow. In an interview with John
Walsh of the television program America’s Most Wanted, President Obama
agreed that a dna database containing every person’s biometric informa-
tion could certainly prove useful (Kravets 2010). As a result of an initiative
called Secure Communities, immigrants and refugees taken into police
custody now have their biometric fingerprints run through a database
to determine whether they can be deported under federal immigration
laws (Aguilar 2010). Google’s ceo, Eric Schmidt, revealed that the com-
pany has not ruled out adding facial recognition to its search technology
(‘‘Google Refuses to Rule Out Face Recognition Technology Despite Pri-
vacy Rows’’ 2010). The company videosurf.com already uses computer
vision technologies to search online videos, allowing users to enter a
particular face as their search term.
This expansion of biometric technologies occurs despite news of their
failures. Thus Obama asserts that a U.S. database of biometric informa-
tion might prove useful when it became clear the U.S. watch list was
‘‘ensnared by error’’ (McIntire 2010). After running a photo of Osama bin
Laden on the ‘‘wanted’’ section of their website and announcing a reward
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