N O T E S
N O T E S T O I N T R O D U C T I O N
1 I am grateful to one of the readers of the initial manuscript
for the term ‘‘political grammar’’ and to both readers for
their thoughtful and generous engagements.
2 I use the terms ‘‘story,’’ ‘‘narrative,’’ and ‘‘grammar’’
throughout the book. By ‘‘stories’’ I mean the overall tales
feminists tell about what has happened in the last thirty to
forty years of Western feminist theory and indicate too
their status as ‘‘myth’’ or ‘‘common opinion.’’ By ‘‘narra-
tives’’ I mean the textual refrains (content and pattern)
used to tell these stories and their movement across time
and space. By ‘‘grammar’’ I mean the techniques (opposi-
tions, intertextual reference, and so on) that serve as nar-
rative building blocks. I also use the term ‘‘political gram-
mar’’ by which I mean to indicate the stitching together of
all these levels as well as the broader political life of these
stories. I have tried to be consistent in how these terms are
used, but there are moments when of course technique
and repetition are not distinct, or where I use other terms
such as ‘‘history’’ to get me out of trouble.
3 You will notice that I have not provided references to
particular authors in my overview here, relying on an ini-
tial sense of these stories as familiar. And it is indeed that
familiarity that I am interested in, that motivates the range
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