I N D E X
1970s: essentialism in, 39–40, 66, 162,
168; as heteronormative, 66; lesbian
feminism in, 51–52; as politically radi-
cal, 64–66, 74, 100, 162; racism and,
13, 66, 168; radical feminism in, 6, 49,
239 n. 9; socialist feminism in, 6, 239
n. 9
1980s: black feminism in, 6, 22, 43–53,
162–63, 231 n. 8; difference and, 5,
40–48; identity and, 5, 47, 162; les-
bian feminism in, 6, 43, 48–57, 162–
63; as politically radical, 66, 74, 162;
poststructuralism and, 45–46, 67, 231
n. 8; as pro-sex, 6, 49–51; as transi-
tional decade, 40–43, 49
1990s: as depoliticized, 67, 162; differ-
ence and, 5, 40–41, 46–48, 50–52; in-
tersectionality and, 48; poststructur-
alism and, 6, 89–93; queer and, 6, 50,
89–93, 162
2000s (noughts), 5, 99
Abu Ghraib, 143
academia: use of abstract language in,
67–69, 185, 232 n. 1; as agent of femi-
nist theory, 34–35; depoliticization
and, 4, 6, 26, 67–93, 232 n. 3; elitism
and, 67–69, 76–78; feminist genera-
tions and, 63–64, 76–84; institu-
tional politics of, 10–11, 74–80, 134–
35, 149–55, 232–33 n. 5; ‘‘star system’’
in, 76, 175–76, 239 n. 12. See also disci-
plinarity; interdisciplinarity
accountability, 150–51, 176–77
Adkins, Lisa, 73
affect: ambivalence as, 63; anger as, 24,
26, 63, 78–81, 223; discomfort as,
200–202; as distinct from emotion,
230 n. 20; enthusiasm as, 106, 108;
friendship as, 149, 202–3; genera-
tional, 150–51, 156; horror and, 197,
215–23, 242 n. 20; identification and,
24, 62–63, 180, 191–92, 195; impor-
tance of, 230 n. 19; intersubjectivity
and, 25; in loss narratives, 21, 62–63,
68–69, 72–73, 78–83; as narrative
technique, 20–21, 23–27, 133–37; pas-
sion as, 3, 23–24, 68, 108; in progress
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