C. AZUSA STREET REVIVAL ACCOUNTS IN
THE APOSTOLIC FAITH (1906–08)
INTRODUCTION
The following reports from Seymour’s Apostolic Faith are important because
they provide firsthand accounts of the revival and his leadership. Seymour
and his editorial team published thirteen editions from September 1906 to
May 1908. Although he served as the Executive Editor, a former newspaper
reporter named Glenn Cook managed the mission and ran the day-to-day
operations of the newspaper for about a year until he left to pioneer the work
in the Midwest and Clara Lum and others replaced him. Florence Crawford,
Lucy Farrow, and others assisted. The first print run was five thousand cop-
ies and the last fifty thousand, distributed free of charge around the world.
Although many of the editorials, testimonials, and sermons are signed, a
large number were left unsigned, probably because it would look unbecom-
ing for Seymour to author so many entries in a single issue.
Against the expressed wishes of Seymour and the Azusa Trustees, Lum
moved the paper to Portland in May 1908 and kept it there, along with the
state, national, and international mailing lists. She left behind only the mail-
ing lists for people in the Los Angeles area. Although Seymour made several
attempts to recover the paper and lists in 1908 and 1909, he was unable to
secure them. He reportedly printed one final edition (October–November
1908) in Los Angeles before giving up the venture. Lum and Crawford con-
tinued to publish the paper from June 1908 to March–April 1910 and there-
after under a diVerent format.
The newspaper was vital to Seymour and the revival for many reasons. It
served as a vehicle through which to teach his followers Pentecostal doctrine
around the world and enabled him and his supporters to respond quickly to
criticisms, misunderstandings, myths, and rumors. He also used it to publish
testimonies, letters, and editorials, which lured the curious, skeptical, and
spiritually hungry. Finally, he used it to challenge Parham and promote his
own vision and version of Pentecostalism. Lum’s decision to take the paper
and mailing lists made it impossible for Seymour to continue to significantly
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