Selective Bibliography
The literature on witch-hunting in Europe and America
is
strongly
marked by differences ojinterpretation-some major, others minor.
In listing a core ojust;lul studies, I have omitted certain books and
articles that are now generally acknowledged to be speculative or
misleading. This does not mean, however, that the studies and in-
terpretations I do list are in agreement-jarfrom it. Anyone ap-
proaching the history ojwitch-huntingjor thefirst time is thert;lore
well advised to begin by reading Chapter
2
ojChristina Larner's
Enemies of God and the note on "Further Reading" that concludes
Robin Briggs's Witches
&
Neighbors. No similar survey existsjor
witch-hunting in New England, but two review-essays I have writ-
ten provide a starting point.
Historiography and Bibliography
Black, George F. "List of Works Relating to Witchcraft in the United
States." Bulletin of the New York Public Library 12 (1908), pp.
658-75.
Briggs, Robin. Witches
&
Neighbors: The Social and Cultural Context
ofEuropean Witchcrqft (New York, 1996).
Hall, David D. "Middle Ground on the Witch-hunting Debate." Re-
views in American History 26 (1998), pp. 345-52.
--- "Witchcraft and the Limits of Interpretation." New England
Quarterly
58
(1985), pp. 253-81.
Larner, Christina. Enemies of God: The Witch-hunt in Scotland
(London, 1981), Chap. 2.
Midelfort, H. C. Erik. "Witchcraft, Magic, and the Occult." in Rifor-
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