Notes
PROLOGUE
I
John Berger and Jean
Mohr,Another Way of Telling
(New York: Pantheon, 1982), pp.
285-86.
2 John Berger and Jean Mohr demonstrate this
inAnother Way of Telling.
Mohr asks nine
people to respond to five of his photographs and records nine separate stories for each
image, each different from his own conception of "what was happening" (pp. 4-1-57).
"Memory, based upon the visual, is freer than reason" (p. 133), Berger writes. "Memory
is a field where different times coexist" (p. 280).
Roy Emerson Stryker and N aney Wood,
In This Proud Land: America,
I93S-I943,
As
Seen
in the
FSA
Photographs
(Greenwich, Conn.: New York GraphiC Society, 1974-), p. 19.
Lange recalled making five photographs, but she actually made six, all of which are
reproduced in Lawrence W Levine, "The Historian and the Icon: Photography and the
History of the American People in the 1930S and 194-0S;' in Carl Fleischhauer and
Beverly W Brannan, eds.,
Documenting America:
I93S-I943
(Berkeley and Los Angeles:
University of California Press, 1988), pp. 16-17.
4- San Francisco News,
March
IO,
1936, cited in Milton Meltzer,
Dorothea Lange: A
Photographers Life
(New York: Farrar, Straus, Giroux, 1978), pp. 133-34-.
"Please, mister;' she wrote to Stryker's assistant Edwin Locke, in charge of the Washing-
ton lab, "this show is the most important photographic show we have. It tours the
country. It tours Europe. I couldn't afford to show prints unsigned, which I have not
even
seen.
I'll send the negatives right back;' Dorothea Lange to Edwin Locke, Sept.
IO,
1936. Cited in Meltzer,
Dorothea Lange,
p. 134-.
6 George P. Elliotr, "Things of This World;'
Commentary
(December 1962) :54-2;
Dorothea
Lange,
exhibit catalog, with an introduction by George
P.
Elliott (New York: Museum
of Modern Art, 1966), p. 7.
7 Dorothea Lange, "The AsSignment I'll Never Forget: Migrant Mother;'
Popular Photog-
raphy
4-6, no. 2 (February 1960) :4-2-4-3, 126.
8 Margery Mann, "Dorothea Lange;'
Popular Photography
66, no. 3 (March 1970) :84-.
9 Willa Cather, "The Best Shott Stories of Sarah Orne Jewett" (1925), in Stephen Tennant,
ed.,
Willa Cather on Writing
(New York: Knopf, 194-9), pp. 4-7-59. There are many
similarities between Kiisebier and Cather: both moved to the western territories as chil-
dren with mothers who followed advenmrous husbands but were never quite com-
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